The Hope Center

Providing a Beacon of Hope

"Safe Kids"

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 National TV Safety Day

In recognition of National TV Safety Day on February 6th the Hope Center and Safe Kids will be giving away two, 2, SANSUS Fixed Position Wall Mounts for flat screen TV's. 

 

The First mount was given away to Jim Walker  at the February 12th boys basketball game against Marshall.

 

The other mount will be given away at the February 20th "Feed the Family" at the Hope Center.

"Safe Kids": Talking Safety at Albion Grade School             2nd Grade Classes - October 2015

Kim Lingafelter and Tonya Moore went to the Albion Grade School, Second Grade, and did a Safe Kids, Walk to School Program.  Complete with Clifford the Big Red Dog Walks to School Books, Safe Kids Reflectors, and Coloring Sheets that was all sent from Safe Kids, which is sponsored by FedEx.

 

Kim and Tonya also passed out sling bags to the kids that were filled with home safetyitems courtesyof Kohls. 

 

   

 

             Fire Prevention for Big Kids

 

Big kids are curious about fire. Teaching your children about the hazards of playing with matches and other flammable materials, as well as practicing a fire escape plan with your family, can help prevent accidents and injuries.

Top Safety Tips

·        Working smoke alarms reduce the chances of dying in a fire by nearly 50 percent. They are a critical first step for staying safe, but in order to be effective, they have to be working properly. For the best protection, install smoke alarms on every level of your home and in every sleeping area.

·        Consider installing a smoke alarm that has a 10-year battery.

·        Teach kids never to play with matches, lighters or fireworks.

·        Keep candles at least 12 inches away from anything that can burn, and always blow them out when you leave the room or before you go to sleep. Teach older kids not to use candles in their bedrooms, unless supervised by an adult.

·        Use common sense in the kitchen. Limit distractions when cooking and don't leave a hot oven or stovetop unattended.

·        Have a fire extinguisher in the kitchen in case of emergency, and make sure you know how it works. You might be surprised that most people don't know how to use one.

·        Children should know how to respond to the sound of a smoke alarm. Teach them to get low and get out when they hear it. A child who is coached properly ahead of time will have a better chance to be safe. Watch our video to learn more.

·        Practice feeling the door, doorknob and cracks around the door with the back of your hand to see if they are too hot. Help your children practice this step.

·        Together, have your family plan and practice a home fire escape plan with two ways out of your house in case of a fire. It is important to have an alternate exit in case one is blocked by fire.

·        Choose a place to meet outside that is a safe distance away from your home.

·        If you cannot safely escape your home or apartment, keep smoke out of the room by covering vents and cracks around the door and call 911 or your fire department as quickly as possible. Then signal for help at the window with a light-colored cloth or a flashlight.

·        To prevent possible fires, avoid plugging several appliance cords into the same electrical socket.

 

·        If using gasoline-powered devices, store gasoline in a locked location where children cannot access it. Keep only small quantities in an approved container that has child safety features. 

Can You Stop Children From Playing With Fire?

 https://youtu.be/JVZ3OoXFVmk

Watch this segment from NBC’s TODAY Show and see what preschoolers do with matches and lighters when the teacher leaves the room. 

                                Fire Safety

Home fires can start and spread quickly, which is why we all need to be careful and educated when it comes to fire safety. Just a little bit of planning can make a big difference for your family.

 

The Hard Facts

In 2013, 334 children died in home fires. Eighty-seven percent of all fire-related deaths are due to home fires, which spread rapidly and can leave families as little as two minutes to escape once an alarm sounds. Fires are not just a problem in the United States. In 2008, nearly 61,000 children around the world died due to a fire or burn.

Top Tips

·        Working smoke alarms reduce the chances of dying in a fire by nearly 50 percent. They are a critical first step for staying safe, but in order to be effective, they have to be working properly. For the best protection, install smoke alarms on every level of your home and in every sleeping area.

·        Teach kids never to play with matches and lighters. Make a habit of placing these items up and away from young children.

·        Create and practice a home fire escape plan with two ways out of every room in case of a fire. Get a stopwatch and time how fast your family can escape. The kids will love it. Here’s a handy worksheet to help get you started. 

·        Children should know how to respond to the sound of a smoke alarm. Teach them to get low and get out when they hear it. A child who is coached properly ahead of time will have a better chance to be safe. Watch our video to learn more.

·        Use common sense in the kitchen. Limit distractions when cooking and don’t leave a hot oven or stovetop unattended.

·        Blow out candles before you leave the room or before you go to sleep.

   Safe Kids Worldwide in DC

Steve and Mary Beth Smith visited Safe Kids Worldwide in DC to find out how to bring more safety programs to Southeastern Illinois. The Hope Center has been affiliated with Safe Kids for over 10 years.

 

The next program the Hope Center and Safe Kids will be "How to get to school safely". Kim Lingafelter and Tonya Moore will be presenting programs in the grade school programs. 

 

What is Safe Kids?

WHO WE ARE

The important thing to remember about preventable injuries is that they are preventable.

Safe Kids Worldwide is a global organization dedicated to preventing injuries in children, the number one killer of kids in the United States. Around the world, a child dies from an unintentional injury every 30 seconds. And millions of children are injured in ways that can affect them for a lifetime.

When a child dies or is seriously injured the lives of families and entire communities are changed forever, but these tragedies don’t have to happen. The important thing to remember about preventable injuries is that they are preventable. They often occur in predictable ways and can be completely avoided with the right education, awareness and planning.

Safe Kids works with an extensive network of more than 400 coalitions in the United States and partners with organizations in 25 countries around the world to reduce injuries from motor vehicles, sports, drownings, falls, burns, poisonings and more.

Since 1988, when Safe Kids was founded by Dr. Marty Eichelberger of the Children’s National Health System with support from founding sponsor, Johnson & Johnson, there has been a 60 percent decrease in the unintentional injury rate among children 19 years and younger.

But losing one child is one too many, and we don’t want any parent to have to endure the loss of a child. That’s why we’re calling on everyone to come together, to raise awareness and to get involved so we can ensure that all children around the world have the chance to grow up healthy and safe, and do all the great things kids were meant to do. 

 Pictured from left to right... Anna Young: Global Network Associate, Mark Ryan: Global Network Coordinator, Kristin Rosenthal: Program Manager, and Hope Center Safe Kids volunteers Mary Beth and Steve Smith.